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Steppe eagles called Khakas, Hurricane, Min and Sin are to Russia after the winter migration – what is special about it
Премия рунета 2017

Steppe eagles called Khakas, Hurricane, Min and Sin are to Russia after the winter migration – what is special about it

19 may 2021
The birds were lucky to survive poachers, power lines, poisoning on their way to Khakassia, Tuva and the south of the Krasnoytarsk Territory - to the places where they were born

This spring, the four steppe eagles returned to the regions of southern Siberia, where they were born three years ago. The steppe eagles Min and Sin flew to the south of the Krasnoyarsk Territory, the Khakas eagle to the Republic of Khakassia, and the Hurricane eagle to the Tuva Republic, according to experts from the World Wildlife Fund of Russia and ornithologists of the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network.

Steppe eagles of Siberia
(c) WWF / Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network
“Steppe eagles named Min and Sin are brothers from the same nest. The birds hatched in 2018 in the Minusinsk Basin of the Krasnoyarsk Territory and are named after this corner. Both eagles spent this winter on the coast of the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf. While Min flew to Russia for a visit “home” in previous years, Sin had not been in his homeland for three years. Sokol visited either Turkmenistan or Kazakhstan. Welcome back! Now Sin, together with the eagle Ming, keep clearly in those areas where the birds hatched. Also, an eagle named Khakas returned to its homeland - in April it keeps close to the nesting territory of its parents in Khakassia. Now Sin, together with the eagle Ming, keep clearly in those areas where the birds hatched. Also, an eagle named Khakas returned to its homeland - in April it keeps close to the nesting territory of its parents in Khakassia. A steppe eagle named Uragan also returned home to Tuva, but the bird stays at a considerable distance from the site where it hatched, although it visited it for a short time”, says Igor Karyakin, WWF expert, ornithologist of the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network.

All birds are equipped with GPS trackers - special devices for tracking migration routes. Steppe Eagles are participants in a conservation project that has been implemented since 2017 by the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network with the support of the World Around You Foundation of Siberian Wellness Corporation and the WWF since 2017.

Map of migration of Steppe Eagles
(c) WWF / Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network
“Unfortunately, the fate of some of the steppe eagles, marked in the framework of our work with trackers, is far from being as successful as that of the four birds that returned to their homeland. So of the five steppe eagles of Southern Siberia, who received trekkers in Khakassia last summer, only two survived by April. The signal from the Eagle Dzhirik tracker disappeared during the autumn migration, back in Russia. The signal of the eagle Shira disappeared in Kazakhstan. Eagle Irma died in the Takla-Makan desert, most likely from a collision with a cell tower, which can be seen in the space image at the place where the tracker signal stopped - the same opinion is shared by Chinese colleagues who examined the place of Irma's disappearance. Only Bel's eagle and Askiz the eagle survived. Askiz successfully wintered in the Indus delta, flew to Pakistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, now he is "honking" from Kazakhstan. And the young eagle Bela wintered in the mountains of China, near the border with Kazakhstan, and even set a record for wintering steppe eagles at low temperatures - this year the temperature here dropped below 30 degrees Celsius. In the spring, the eagle went east, having flown over the Dzungar plain, flew to Mongolia, returned to China, and at the end of April reached the Mongolian Altai”, says Igor Karyakin, WWF expert, ornithologist of the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network.

You can follow the flight of the Steppe Eagles in Southern Siberia on special maps: http://rrrcn.ru/ru/migration/se2018  and http://rrrcn.ru/ru/migration/se2020

Ornithologists in the expedition
(c) WWF / Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network
"The results of tracking rare birds confirm: the main threat to the steppe eagle remains power lines that are not equipped with bird protection devices, poisons, including bromadiolone, one of the most dangerous, used to combat rodents in the fields, and simply human stupidity - shooting birds for fun" - says Igor Karjakin, WWF expert, ornithologist of the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network.

Over the past decades, the number of the Steppe Eagle in the world has decreased dramatically, and the nesting area of ​​the species has shrunk. There are no more than 40 thousand pairs in the world, in Russia from 2 to 3 thousand, and in the Altai-Sayan ecoregion from 1430 to 1770 pairs of steppe eagles.

For additional information please contact
Altai-Sayan ecoregional press-officer
Senior Project Coordinator