We want the WWF site to be comfortable and interesting for you. We work with web analytics to become better. Cookies are used to collect analytical data. All information is completely confidential and is never passed on to third parties. Confirm your agreement with the policy regarding cookies or learn more about the technology.
Accept
What we do
Regions
Home / News and publications / News / Amur river /
The first results of public monitoring of salmon spawning grounds were obtained for the Amgun, Anyui and Tunguska Rivers
Премия рунета 2017

The first results of public monitoring of salmon spawning grounds were obtained for the Amgun, Anyui and Tunguska Rivers

10 december 2018
The Association of Indigenous People of the Northern Khabarovsky Province with support of WWF Russia surveyed the spawning grounds of Pacific salmon on large tributaries of the Amur River. Expeditions were undertaken to clarify the filling of the main spawning grounds of the autumn chum.

In October, conservationists monitored salmon spawning sites on three big tributaries of the Amur with the support of WWF. To do this, three brigades of volunteers were formed. They covered 200 kilometers along Anyui, 1000 kilometers along Amgun in air and wooden boats with outboards, on foot, and by cars. Over 10 spawning sites on each of the three rivers were observed. The assessment showed that the density of the spawning population tends toward zero.

Right away the salmon number forecast is based on the salmon catch statistics but WWF suggests using data on a real filling of the spawning sites instead. The monitoring allows exploring the spawning grounds and assessing the real number of salmon entering the Amur tributaries to breed. The data collected on three tributaries will be converted into the consolidated report and agreed proposals to be delivered to the Commission for Anadromous Fish Catch Control in Khabarovsky Province. From WWF’ perspective, a wise use of the data will enable the Commission to set justified salmon catch limits. The lack of adequate estimation of the salmon stock in the Amur River basin will inevitably lead to its depletion which will threaten the traditional life style of the Amur River aboriginals and will unpredictably impact the whole ecosystem of the low and middle Amur reaches. The Association of Indigenous People of the Northern Khabarovsky Province is one of WWF’ partner in these activities. 

Salmon monitoring
Alexander Frolenok
For additional information please contact
Project Coordinator of Protected Areas Unit, WWF Russia Amur Branch